Hoʻākea Source



PUʻUHONUA SOCIETY
HONOLULU, OʻAHU, HAWAIʻI






OUR 2024 GRANT CYCLE IS NOW CLOSED


Hoʻākea Source is a regranting program that furthers the mission of Puʻuhonua Society by creating new opportunities to support and honor visual artists living and working in Hawaiʻi and by affirming Native Hawaiian value-systems.


Hoʻākea Source embodies the teachings of the well known ʻōlelo noʻeau, Hawaiian proverb, "ʻike aku, ʻike mai, kōkua aku, kōkua mai; pela iho la ka nohona ʻohana." Indeed, those who recognize others are recognized, those who help others are helped—such is expansive family life. It is only through our mutual dependence on one another that we thrive.

Hoʻākea Source is a Regional Regranting Program Partner of the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts. The Regional Regranting Program partners with local arts organizations around the country to make grants to artists and collectives for projects that chart new creative territory in their communities.

The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts Regional Regranting Program aims to support vibrant, under-the-radar artistic activity by partnering with leading cultural institutions in communities across the country. The program allows the Foundation to reach the sizable population of informal, non-incorporated artist collectives and to support their alternative gathering spaces, publications, websites, events and other projects. The Foundation plans to expand this program with partner organizations in areas where the level of on-the-ground, self-organized artistic activity is highest.


Information for Grant Seekers 


Distribution of Funds:
Hoʻākea Source will award six to twelve grants, ranging from $5,000 to $10,000, to selected projects. In our inaugural two-year grant period, we will prioritize visual artists, collaboratives, and collectives living and working across the island of Oʻahu. In the case of collaboratives and collectives, some contributors may live off island, but the lead applicant must live and work on Oʻahu. Applications from members of historically marginalized communities that serve all of Hawai‘i’s people are especially encouraged. Total award monies distributed will be $60,000 per year.


Review Criteria:
All proposals will be considered based on the following criteria. Proposed Research and Projects should speak directly to one or more of the following three strategic priorities:

  • ʻĀina  (That which feeds): Proposals that are rooted in place; proposals that center love and/or stewardship of land, sky, and sea.

  • Pilina  (Relationality): Proposals that build meaningful relationships; proposals that weave past, present and future together through emerging and/or sustained commitment to groups, collaborations, and/or collectives. 

  • Huli  (Change): Proposals that affirm a (k)new way of being; proposals that advance more just futures and/or contribute to systemic transformation.

Applications will be reviewed on overall concept and feasibility, with an emphasis on experimentation and risk taking; unconventional viewpoints are encouraged. Applicants should describe their relationship to Hawai‘i and how their work as a visual artist demonstrates a commitment to this place. Responses should speak to how long they have been an active participant in the local arts ecosystem and in what ways their work serves Hawaiʻi. 

A successful application will: 

  • Speak directly to what the proposal is, who it involves, and which of the three strategic priorities it most closely aligns with and why
  • Situate an artistic practice within a larger visual arts genealogy of Hawaiʻi 
  • Demonstrate a capacity to realize the project on time and within budget 
  • Explain how the public would engage with the project with an emphasis on non-conventional exhibition spaces
  • Describe the potential impact on a local community and the larger arts and culture landscape of Hawaiʻi 

Selection Panel:
A selection committee of 3 members; with the majority being Hawai‘i based artists and curators well respected across local communities, as well as an invited curator or artist from outside of Hawaiʻi, will review eligible applications over two days with oversight and assistance by the Program Director and Puʻuhonua Society Executive Director.

2023-24 Grant Cycle



  • October 2023: Program Announcement
  • November 2023: Outreach and Information Sessions
  • November 28, 2023: Application period opens
  • December 2023: Public information sessions
  • January 2024: One-on-one consultations 
  • January 31, 2024: Application period closes
  • February 2024: Applications shared with selection panel and ranked to create a finalist pool. 
  • March 2024: First round artist-grantees are notified of selection panel’s decision.
  • March 2024: First round of grant monies distributed.


    Our inaugural grant cycle will open on November 28, 2023, coinciding with Lā Kūʻokoʻa, the Kingdom of Hawaiʻi’s National Independence Day. 


    INFO SESSION VIDEO  


    FAQs


    Does my project have to be collaborative?
    No.

    How long do I have to complete my project?
    Award recipients will have one calendar year from the date of award notification to complete their projects and public event and submission of a final report.

    In a collaborative, who should be listed as the lead organizer?
    The lead organizer(s) should identify as an artist working in the visual arts. It is not a requirement that all members of the project self-identify as artists, or work in the visual/performing arts.

    Can I apply for a grant to cover equipment?
    Yes, but equipment purchases should reflect no more than 20% of the amount awarded.

    Can I apply for a project that has already started?
    Yes, existing projects that seek to expand their reach or are considered “ongoing” can be considered.

    Do I need to have a confirmed venue to apply?
    No. We do not require you to have confirmed venues, or written commitment from any service, affiliate, presenter, or space you choose to engage.

    What is the maximum amount of funding I can apply for?
    The maximum amount of funding that can be applied for is $10,000. If the cost of your project is more than $10,000, please specify what the amount requested from Hoʻākea Source will be supporting.

    Can I be granted less money than I ask for?
    Yes. The jurors may decide to award you less than you ask.

    How and when will the awards be selected?
    Hoʻākea Source will invite three jurors (comprised of regionally and internationally recognized curators and arts professionals), who will review all eligible submissions and select the grantees.

    What is the tax obligation if I receive a grant?
    All monies received through Hoʻākea Source are considered taxable income. We advise you to consult an accountant or tax professional regarding obligations for taxable income.

    For a more detailed background on the program and to be walked step-by-step through the application please see the 30 minute information video found here

    Further questions can be directed to info@hoakeasource.org



    Pu‘uhonua Society creates opportunities for Native Hawaiian and Hawai‘i-based artists and cultural practitioners to express themselves and engage with and impact audiences. We support artists and makers who serve as translators/mediators/amplifiers of social justice issues in the community.

    Pu‘uhonua Society traces its history back to 1972, when Emma Aluli Meyer originally founded the organization as the Young of Heart Workshop & Gallery. Emma was the youngest daughter of Noa Webster Aluli, a Hawaiian attorney and community advocate. She started the Young of Heart Workshop & Gallery in Kailua, O‘ahu, to inspire and empower young people through art and creativity. 

    For more than 15 years, the community center presented art exhibitions and offered classes in woodworking, ceramics, drawing, cooking, and painting, as well as performances. During that time, the center hosted the first Windward performance by the Honolulu Symphony; gallery shows by artists Jean Charlot, Claude Horan, and Juliette May Frazier; and the premier of Terrance Knapp’s Father Damien monologue.

    In 1996, Emma’s third daughter, Maile Meyer, became Executive Director, and in 2004, Young of Heart Workshop changed its name to Pu‘uhonua Society* to better reflect its renewed mission as a safe haven for artists and cultural practitioners. For 25 years Maile envisioned and worked to create thriving creative spaces including CONTACT, an annual curated-juried exhibition of innovative, comprehensive and disruptive contemporary art that ran for six years; The Gathering Project, reactivating ʻIolani Palace as a gathering place for community exchange and connection; and Aupuni Space, a contemporary art gallery, artist studios and community space in Kakaʻako that continues today, alongside countless other community driven programs and projects.

    Today, Puʻuhonua Society is led by a third generation of Meyer wahine, with Emma Broderick, eldest daughter of Maile, serving as Executive Director. Puʻuhonua Societyʻs programs also include Keanahala, a community weaving program that perpetuates the Native Hawaiian practice of ulana lauhala; Hoʻomau Nā Maka o ka ʻĀina, working to preserve and make publicly accessible Nā Maka o ka ʻĀinaʻs entire 8,000 moving image archive; KĪPUKA, a makersʻ space and series of classes and workshops that are focused around the perpetuation of material cultural practices, and NiUNOW!, a cultural agroforestry movement affirming the importance of niu and uluniu, coconut and coconut groves to the health of Hawaiʻi and its people.

    * The first pu‘uhonua organization was established in 1914 by a group of Hawaiians that included Noa Webster Aluli. ʻAhahui Pu‘uhonua o Nā Hawai‘i was a social and legal services center focused on helping Hawaiians during this difficult time in our nation’s history following the illegal occupation of the Hawaiian Kingdom.









    In accordance with Andy Warhol’s will, the mission of The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts is the advancement of the visual arts.


    The Foundation manages an innovative and dynamic grants program while also preserving Warhol’s legacy through creative and responsible licensing policies and extensive scholarly research for ongoing catalogue raisonne projects. To date, the Foundation has given $280 million in cash grants to over 1,000 arts organizations in 49 states and abroad and has donated 52,786 works of art to 322 institutions worldwide.

    The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts Regional Regranting Program aims to support vibrant, under-the-radar artistic activity by partnering with leading cultural institutions in communities across the country. The program allows the Foundation to reach the sizable population of informal, non-incorporated artist collectives and to support their alternative gathering spaces, publications, websites, events and other projects. The Foundation plans to expand this program with partner organizations in areas where the level of on-the-ground, self-organized artistic activity is highest.


    BACKGROUND

    INFORMATION FOR GRANT SEEKERS
    2023–24 GRANT CYCLE 

    FAQs

    PUʻUHONUA SOCIETY
    ANDY WARHOL FOUNDATION FOR THE VISUAL ARTS
    CONTACT US

    Sign up for our newsletter:

    * indicates required










    Puʻuhonua Society
    P.O. Box 3080
    Honolulu, HI 96802








    Donnie Cervantes
    Program Director,
    Hoʻākea Source
    dfc@hoakeasource.org

    Emma Broderick
    Executive Director,
    Puʻuhonua Society
    emma@puuhonua-society.org

    info@hoakeasource.org
    (808) 600-0519